What the Gibson Guitar Bankruptcy is telling us

 Photo taken at Fredricksburg Municipal Airport in Fredricksburg, Texas. Pilots were becoming certified in formation flying. You can't fly a Warbird like that unless you are a Mastery Worthy of Praise

Photo taken at Fredricksburg Municipal Airport in Fredricksburg, Texas. Pilots were becoming certified in formation flying. You can't fly a Warbird like that unless you are a Mastery Worthy of Praise

It's no secret that instrument sales have been on the decline globally. Listen to any radio station and you can understand why. The youth are gravitating towards easier paths to success through their music by utilizing digital means of production such as laptops and interfaces.

There is nothing wrong with that. I'm always an advocate for somebody putting their time into a creative endeavor so they are not spending their time doing negative shit.

Where the problem arises is that everyone is doing it. Some are mastering their craft and some aren’t and mastery doesn't necessarily translate into success in the marketplace with those types of art forms.

It used to be you had to be good at something before society rewarded you for that effort. Now all you have to do is be perceived as being good or special or as the savior or whatever we're being said we should buy into. This is why the Fake Artists and Fake Gurus have been so successful. They create the illusion that they are special. But a real master sees a perpetrator a million miles away. And when a real master is contrasted against someone parading themselves as being something special that the reality becomes apparent. It is always better to take the slow route to success and become a master worthy of praise as opposed to building an unsustainable brand, image or popshot fad of a product.

So how does this relate to the bankruptcy of Gibson Guitar? It tells us that if you do in fact figure out how to learn how to play a guitar you might actually have an edge over all the people that are doing the opposite.

There is nothing wrong with making electronic music or rapping. I can do both. The reason I can do them and do them well is because I mastered an instrument first. It gave me an edge and made those forms of music easy to produce because I had already done something difficult.

So whatever it is that you do, don't throw mastery out the window. It's okay to chase the hit song, but don't make that your entire reality because fads and tastes change. Being badass at a craft is timeless.